Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Project: Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel
Architects: Bengo Studio
Location: Xiuing, China
Area: 1,291 sq ft
Photographs by: Chen Hao

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Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio

The Qiyun Mountain Tree House is a modern hotel designed by Bengo Studio in China’s Xiuing district.
Comprising of a series of stacked timber volumes, this tree house hotel measures a total of 1,291 square feet of usable area. It is a rather small hotel consisting of two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a living room. All of these internal areas are connected through a spiral staircase in the middle of the structure while the top most story is designated as a landscape room that offers sweeping vistas of the beautiful forest that surrounds the hotel.

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

The Qiyun Mountain Tree House is located in the region of Xiuning County which is 33 kilometres south of Huangshan City, Anhui Province. As a part of the Qiyun Mountain Scenic Area, the tree house is surrounded by a sea of red cedars.

The 11-metre-tall tree house is of the same height as its neighboring mature-age red cedars. The house is a superposition of seven rooms as large as six to nine square meters, i.e., the entrance hall, two bedrooms, two bathrooms, the living room and the landscape room. The two sets of bedrooms and bathrooms are separated by the entrance hall, thus available for two families to live in at the same time without disturbing one another. The living room and the landscape room are built at the top of the house as public space. All seven rooms are connected by a spiral staircase in the center.

Bengo Studio

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

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Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

 

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

Qiyun Mountain Tree House Hotel by Bengo Studio in Xiuing, China

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Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Project: Casa JLM
Architects: Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto
Location: Chicxulub, Mexico
Area: 4,300 sq ft (plot)
Photographs by: Courtesy of Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto

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Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto

Casa JLM is a luxurious beachfront residence located in Chicxulub, Mexico on one of the most traditional summer beaches of the Yucatan coast. Designed by Enrique Cabrera Arquitectothis home resides on a 4,300 square feet plot that offers an undisturbed view of the beautiful beach from all three stories of the house. The building itself is designed in the contemporary style, keeping the private areas on the last floor which maintains privacy while allowing for breathtaking views.

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

This project is located on one of Chicxulub Puerto’s most traditional summer beaches of the Yucatan coast, 40 minutes north of the city of Merida, on a plot of 4,300 square feet with a frontage of 3 feet and 130 feet deep, and a clear view to the beach.

Three levels were constructed with a full mastery of the environment and surrounding buildings. The owners commissioned a home with a conventional program on two floors which gives priority to family life. A double height was integrated, creating a mezzanine above the kitchen with views of the terrace and the beach and free of structural elements, making it a unique place where you can participate in all social activities.

The private areas on the third level reach above the other existing houses, with a range that allows for views of the coast from the bedrooms while also maintaining privacy.

The concrete texture symbolizes the strength and robustness that protects the house and is contrasted by the use of glass with its transparent and fragile qualities.

A home where a variety of indoor and outdoor spaces are linked is generated by the beauty of the Yucatan coast.

Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

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Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto in Chicxulub, Mexico

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17 Tremendous Industrial Home Exterior Designs You’ve Never Seen Before

Unique as it gets, the industrial home exterior design is certainly eye-catching. But its eccentricity doesn’t make it any less elegant or beautiful than the home exteriors designed in other styles such as the modern, contemporary, rustic or Mediterranean. In fact, this beautiful eccentricity is what makes the industrial style so desirable. In this collection, we want to showcase you the many different forms an industrial home can take. It has a very wide range of materials, shapes and finishes that make a unique and modern piece of home design when combined carefully.

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Welcome to a new collection of home designs in which we want to show you 17 Tremendous Industrial Home Exterior Designs You’ve Never Seen Before. Check them out below and remember that we’ve featured almost all parts of the industrial home in our recent showcase. You can find inspiration in the form of industrial deckslandscapespatios and swimming pools as far as outdoor areas go. We’ve also featured the interiors such as the industrial kitchenbedroombathroomliving roomdining roomhome officekids’ roomstaircase and hallway. Enjoy!

1. Industrial Home Exterior

2. Monitor Street, Brooklyn

3. Palo Verde in Arizona

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4. Picard Lane

5. Industrial Home Exterior

6. 1005 Brass

7. Old Brewery Residence

8. Zinc House

9. Sunnyland Residence

10. Love Shack

11. Lucky John Residence

12. Casa Fck in Barcelona

13. Rain Shelter House

14. Little B

15. Hunter Valley Farmhouse

16. Delz Warehouse

17. Industrial Exterior

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House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

Project: Villa in Munich
Architects: Stephan Maria Lang
Location: Munich, Germany
Area: 8,072 sq ft
Photographs by: Hans Kreye

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House L by Stephan Maria Lang

Stephan Maria Lang have designed an L-shaped residence in Munich, Germany. Called the House L it is an energy efficient home designed for a young family. There’s a tall white wall protecting the home from the street while the home opens up to a wonderful backyard on the other side.
Built with concrete core cooling and heating, House L also makes use of sun collectors, a thermal heat pump and controlled air ventilation. All of these systems meet the German standards for a low-energy home which makes it the perfect modern home that provides its residents with more than they’ll ever need while consuming almost nothing at all.

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

Winning a competition Stephan Maria Lang provides a home to a young family in a Munich residential area.

The L-shaped building is protected towards the street by a 7 Meter high white wall. A copper clad garage laid in front forms a protected driveway- space and one great opening marks the needle ear to the very private garden and living space behind the wall. A spatial continuum connected to nature by large sliding doors and a weather protected veranda facing a 15 Meter long work out pool which is used almost all year thanks to an efficient energy saving concept. The parent- and children sleeping area on the second floor are separated by a two story open entrance volume.

Natural autochthon materials reduced to oiled natural oak and dark shell limestone in contrast to white plastered walls give the house the briefed atmosphere of a classic Bauhaus Villa.

An efficiently planned energy concept, with concrete core cooling-heating, sun collectors, thermal heat pump and controlled air ventilation, meets the standards of a German low-energy house.

Stephan Maria Lang

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

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House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

House L by Stephan Maria Lang in Munich, Germany

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Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Project: Chilmark House
Architects: Gray Organschi Architecture, Aaron Schiller
Location: Chilmark, Dukes County, Massachusetts, USA
Area: 6,000 sq ft
Photographs by: Courtesy of the architects

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Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller

Located in Chilmark, a small town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, this contemporary home was precisely placed on the plot it occupies which also became the focus of its decor. It is a project by Gray Organschi Architecture and Aaron Schiller for which the goal was to design a home that can house a multi-generational family.
The overall design of the home follows an open plan where the clear glass walls redirect the views to the outside where its residents can enjoy undisturbed views of the vast Chilmark Pond as well as the Atlantic in the distance.

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark’s long agrarian history on the windswept southern edge of Martha’s Vineyard underpins the design approach to this house and studio for a multi-generational family. The site, a former sheep grazing field, overlooks Chilmark pond, with long views to the Atlantic, and is edged by a series of Chilmark’s massive, meandering stone fences. In deference to the field’s history, and to the simple New England forms that shape the area’s architectural heritage, we developed the house and studio as a pair of barns with low pitched roofs that sit quietly in the landscape. Two buildings form a series of courtyards and outdoor spaces, with varying degrees of privacy and views. In a nod to New England’s bank barns, the long barn is set into the hillside, diminishing its scale from the north and creating direct connections to the outside from both upper and lower levels.

At the heart of this design process lies a mentorship and evolving collaboration. Five years ago, Alan Organschi was approached by his student, Aaron Schiller, whom he had taught during Yale’s first year building project. Aaron asked Gray Organschi to share the firm’s long experience with house design and to work collaboratively on the project. Aaron, whose family had spent decades in Chilmark and had outgrown their beloved A-frame, led the family quest for a new piece of land that would accommodate a family compound and, after years of searching, he found this rare piece of land.

The simple, dark buildings are approached via a farm road that winds through Chilmark’s dense thicket of scrub oak. A broad stair links a large south-facing porch back to the farm road and provides pedestrian access through the field to the beaches beyond. Based in a shared love of the dense aggregation of New England’s farm complexes, we sited the studio and the house barns tightly together, creating a charged outdoor space between them, which provides the approach to the house’s entrance. The sweeping Atlantic views are only experienced after a visitor enters the house; the northwest entry courtyard is edged by a mute, charred cedar wall with screened apertures, creating a private courtyard with views west over the rolling fields and stone fences. Inside the dark buildings, bleached ash lines all surfaces. The ceilings in the public rooms lift to the high ridges, with dropped areas to create a children’s sleeping loft high in the roof. The lower level creates a series of bedrooms with shared spaces between that look into light wells, landscaped with local rocks and moss.

The family felt strongly that the house should meld Chilmark’s traditions of simple agrarian forms with its equally compelling history of progressivism and openness. The barn complex sits quietly within the old landscape, while the buildings’ open plan reaches outward to the light and views beyond, providing warm, convivial space for family and friends.

Gray Organschi Architecture

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

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Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

Chilmark House by Gray Organschi Architecture + Aaron Schiller in Massachusetts

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Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Project: Concrete House
Architects: Wespi de Meuron Romeo architects
Location: Gambarogno, Switzerland
Area: 1,377 sq ft
Photographs by: Hannes Henz

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Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects

Wespi de Meuron Romeo architectsa Swiss architecture studio has encased the walls of this contemporary home with coarse concrete which is where it gets its name Concrete House from. It is located in the municipality of Gambarogno in Switzerland on a site from which it overlooks Lake Maggiore.
The house belongs to one of the directors of the studio that designed it, therefore it is set on a steep slope right next to the architects’ studio. It spreads along three stories where two of them sit below street level.

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

The house, designed as a residence for a family of three persons, was built in the immediate proximity of the architecture office in Caviano on the Lake Maggiore.

In terms of adequate architectural densification new living space should be created on a remaining area of just 128 m2 (1,378 ft2), on the same plot as the architecture office was built in 1981, without damaging the existing qualities. On the contrary, an enrichment of the outer spatial situation should be generated with reasonable densification in context with the existing building.

The building laws determined the outer form of the building, what often happens when leftover plots are developed. The minimal distance to the road, the minimal distance to the forest, the minimal building distance to the architecture office as well as the right to build on the limit to the southwest neighbour, create an irregular pentagonal form of totally 79 m² (850 ft²) surface. A clear rectangle of 48 m² (517 ft²) surface, which is the isolated interior, was integrated in this irregular form.

The polygonal exterior shape and the steep topography of the site let the building appear as an archaic stone block in middle of the forest, this is reinforced by the rough washed concrete surfaces becoming darker by the weathering.

To the mountain-sided street the construction presents itself as a closed, simple one-storey volume. The only opening towards the street is the raw steel gate leading to the entrance court. A 3 m (102 ft) wide forecourt with a natural stone pavement and two palms connects the house to the street and upgrade it spatially.

To the valley-side, the house appears as a narrow 3-storey tower. The house is organised on three floors: the top floor on the street level accommodates the entrance, the main living area and dining with the open kitchen, on two sides it’s completely closed and on the other two sides it’s completely vitrified towards the courtyards.

The entrance courtyard on the mountainside protects the house against insight from the street and in the meantime it lets the sunlight in. The inner courtyard on the seaside releases the view to the lake and the mountains through a big roofed opening; while it’s closed wall surfaces reflect the sunlight to the inside.

Both courtyards, each with a wisteria, let the living room becomes a “garden” room and let the inhabitants experience in an unusual intense way the varying atmospheres of the weather and the light.

A skylight above the staircase allows light to penetrate into the lower floor, which accommodates two bedrooms, each with its own outdoor loggia, the bathroom and the stairs to the cellar, where is the technique and a workspace.

Wespi de Meuron Romeo architects

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

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Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

Concrete House by Wespi de Meuron Romeo Architects in Switzerland

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House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

Project: House on the Top
Architects: Mutar Estudio
Location: Curanipe, Chile
Area: 1,614 sq ft
Photographs by: Leo Basoalto

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House on the Top by Mutar Estudio

Designed by Mutar Estudiothe House on the Top is a modern residence commissioned by two couples who co-own a site near Curanipe, a coastal town in Chile.
It is divided into three pavilions. Two of them are intended as private sections for each couples while the third one is more of a communal area where they can interact and socialize with each other. The entire building is also raised on a podium that gives it better views of the Chovellen River. The large windows frame the expansive vistas while also harvesting natural light.

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

Curanipe is a small coastal town in the middle part of Chile; territory of subsistence agriculture, artisanal fishing and summer tourism. In this place two couples owned a site far away from the sea, but compensated with large views towards the ravine of Chovellén River. The site is on the highest point of the ravine where the slope descends gently to the sea and abruptly to the river.

Because of its geographic condition the place lacks of a horizontal ground, reason why the architecture tries to supply that lack building a podium that look towards the ravine.

This house should give occasional shelter to the both couples who would use it together or separated. Given this condition of occupation, the program divides itself in three pavilions where each couple would be “owner” of one of this ones, meanwhile the third one – at center – would contain the common areas. The three pavilions locate parallel to each other but displaced in order to accommodate at the diagonal slope of the site.

The distant landscape is captured by interior through large openings that frame it – like big paintings – extending the interior limits beyond its borders.

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

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House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

House on the Top by Mutar Estudio in Curanipe, Chile

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True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

Project: True North House
Architects: Tandem
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Photographs by: John Gollings

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True North House by Tandem

Tandema Melbourne-based studio, have designed the True North House in the Kensington neighborhood of Melbourne. This home is very unique, starting from its exterior, it is full of creative solutions all the way to the interiors. First of all, its corrugated metal exterior is curved and the house takes on an unusual shape because it is located on a triangular plot that was occupied by a worn out 1950s cottage with a stable.

The stable was renovated and now it has become a one-bedroom townhouse while the house was replaced by a three-bedroom residence with a triangular form that makes the most out of the irregularly shaped site.

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

Architecture offers another approach, that sets aside other buildings, creating a glimpse into an alternative world that is at once seductive and utterly compelling.

This long tapering triangular corner site in Kensington has an historic stables built in the 1880s, located along a disused lane and a new, curvilinear three bedroom house.

True North was featured on Grand Designs Australia in June 2017.

The new dwelling is high performance solar passive 7.3 star rated house with living on the ground floor and sleeping above.

The open corner block is wide enough to accommodate two rooms and a corridor on the western boundary, narrowing to a single room towards the east. Rounding the ends of the triangular form set in play a language of soft, curving elements that extend and enfold space in and around the building.

The custom made zig-zag folded metal facade creates a continuous, curving pleat pinned together over the front door. The curving form is visually dynamic, appearing to be always in motion. The pleats are punctured by rusted metal hoods that frame views from the upper level bedrooms into the neighbourhood.

Placed in the centre of the block, the facade undulates and bends to create north facing pocket gardens, rear produce garden and to encourage light to enter neighbouring rear yards.

The lower level is for living, containing living, dining & kitchen spaces while the upper level is sleeping, accommodating bedrooms and bathrooms.

Low height walls from reclaimed brick ground the floating form, connecting the building to the heritage listed brick stables.

The new dwelling claims the corner, rounding in a continuous organic form that deliberately confuses the reading of front, side and back.

At the rear of the block, the double brick stables were stabilized by a cross braced timber internal structure and restored as a one bedroom townhouse. 

Dilapidated and neglected, the existing brickwork was pinned to a heavy weight timber framed internal framework supported off a new internal concrete ring beam and infill slab. The original brick floor was relayed and upper level timber framed loft floor re-finished.

Tandem

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

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True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

True North House by Tandem in Melbourne, Australia

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House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

Project: House H
Architects: Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects
Location: Matsudo, Chiba, Japan
Area: 688 sq ft
Photographs by: Fumihiko Ikemoto

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House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects

Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architectsa Japanese studio, have designed the House H in the city of Matsudo, in the Japanese prefecture of Chiba. They took the design of the iconographic image of a house and they have reinvented the interior layout, more specifically, the sequence of spaces.
The construction is made entirely out of wood and it is organized by two clusters of 4 columns that create repetitive frames with two-dimensional Y-shaped column trees. They are used to separate three sections.

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

This is a house for young couple and their child, located in Matsudo, Chiba Prefecture. Matsudo City has a background that has developed as a residential area on the outskirts of Tokyo from the 1960s. This house was planned rebuilding of the house, which was built at that time. I seemed to have been asked to build a house as a new symbol in this place by a young family with the hope of the future.

So, I hoped to propose the house as living symbol by utilizing a big roof and structural member actually in their daily life rather than just image.

At first I placed a big roof in the site, and arranged the eight Y-shaped wooden frames in it. I planned to each space by hanging second floors and loft floors from them. Like a bunch of attic beams of traditional wooden architecture, Y-shaped frames made of bonded wood run through the entire house. And the six floorboards are hung from them at different level. Depending on the level and location of floorboards, the distance from big roof and other living space will be changed, the space of under the floorboards as well. Although whole house is just one space under big roof, it divided loosely with Y-shaped frames and floorboards, so that people stay each space feeling each other.

I hope that the family uses the structure of house in their daily life and that the structure related to their daily life. For example people hanging pictures and figures from Y-shaped frames and marking height of child along his growth on it. And they will leave the trail of their life on the house like a well thumbed book.

Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

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House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

House H by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects in Chiba, Japan

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Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

Project: Aloni House
Architects: decaARCHITECTURE
Location: Antiparos Island, Greece
Area: 2,551 sq ft
Photographs by: Erieta Attali

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Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE

decaARCHITECTUREa Greek architecture studio, have designed the Aloni House on the Greek island of Antiparos. This unique residence takes advantage of rustic, energy-efficient materials that allow the house to blend in with the rugged terrain of the serene Mediterranean landscape that it is surrounded by.
The valley on which the Aloni House is situated offers beautiful views of the coast even though it is built with a low profile, consisting of two stone walls connected by a stunning green roof.

Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

The design of the house is a dual response to the particular topography of the site and to the rural domestication techniques that in the past shaped the raw ‘Cycladic island’ landscape.

In the past, dry-rubble stone walls domesticated the land for agricultural purposes and were the most prominent man-made interventions in the landscape. The walls retained earth and transformed a steep topography into a series of arable plateaus. Today, the Cycladic islands are being reshaped by a very different force: the demand for holiday homes. The design uses the precedent of earth-retaining stone walls to create an artificial landscape that is both rural and domestic in use.

The site is a natural saddle where two slopes meet. In the North-South axis the slope rises between two hills while in the East-West axis the slope drops, opening to the sea views. Two long stone walls bridge the hills allowing the house to nestle in the space within while maintaining the continuity of the landscape which flows over it. This simple strategy blurs the edges of the house and makes its mass imperceptible within the broader skyline of the island.

The presence of the house is revealed by the four courtyards carved into the flowing landscape. The courtyards separate the living spaces into five interior areas, an arrangement which resembles the fifth side of a dice. As a result, the house is protected from the elements yet is full of natural light, generous views and a compact but rich relationship to its setting.

The name of the house itself, Aloni, refers to the remains of a crop-harvesting circle that was found and preserved as part of the agricultural past of the site.

decaARCHITECTURE

Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

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Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

Aloni House by decaARCHITECTURE on The Antiparos Island in Greece

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